Writer in Residence 2017

The Writer in Residence programme provides valuable, paid, publishing opportunities online and in print for outstanding arts writers. It invites resident writers to engage with the programme as they choose and with the aim of publishing thoughts and essays that open up wider contextual debate surrounding the issues and themes explored through Jerwood Visual Arts projects. This writing provides featured artists with much-valued critical reflection and context on their work and exhibitions.

James Gormley

James will respond to three exhibitions, Jerwood Solo Presentations, the Jerwood/FVU Awards 2017: Neither One Thing or Another and Soheila Sokhanvari, Paradise Lost.

James is a Dublin born London-based writer and artist. His critical and contextual texts have appeared in a number of independently published artists publications, and he is a frequent contributor to the online journal thisistomorrow.info. In March 2016 he was awarded the Art & Culture Volume XII criticism prize. Recent areas of research have included the status of artistic labour where it intersects, overlaps or contrasts with the world of waged employment. An article on this topic, prompted by the practice of German artist Maria Eichhorn, will be published in Elephant magazine in December 2017.

Hatty Nestor

Hatty will respond to two exhibitions: Jerwood Makers Open 2017 and Ryan L. Moule, Vessels and Vestiges.

Hatty is a writer based in London. She has an undergraduate degree from Goldsmiths College in Art History and a masters degree in Critical Writing form Royal College of Art, for which she received a full scholarship and writing prize for her final major project. She has been published in Frieze, ArtinAmerica, BOMBmagazine,TenderJournal and Studio International, amongst others. She is finishing her book Ethical Portraits which investigates representations of individuals in constraining situations, such as prisons. She is interested in collective experiences of art, the personal as political alongside ideas of making and where and how we negotiate ownership. She views writing as a tool to explore identity and art in relation to the private and public sphere, with the intention of constructing alternative dialogues which otherwise might be hidden.